Forest Thrones, Part 11: Drybrushing

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I suddenly remembered I hadn’t painted the undersides of the trees, so I took a moment to do that.

I also went over the trees, filling in the worst of the gaps in the texture with paperclay. I also filled in around the bottom so it looks properly attached to the ground, and the place where the roots overhang the edges of the base so they would be nice and flat on the bottom. Once I add a little gloss, it’ll look amazing.

Now I want to show you how to drybrush a sculpture. Drybrushing is a technique that uses layers of paint to emphasize the features of a texture. It mimics the way light and shadows fall on something full-sized.

First, you need to gather your tools and supplies. Drybrushing is hard on brushes, so you want to use an old, cheap, or previously damaged brush.  A large, flat brush is a good choice, but really, whatever you have that you don’t mind getting messed up. Then, select a paint for your tree. The paint that you want to be the overall impression of color for your tree (in art we say that it “reads” a certain color) is going to be the middle tone. After you choose that color, you need to choose (or mix) a darker color and a lighter color. You want the darker and lighter colors to be shades of the middle color or as close to it as you can manage. (Go ahead and use black to mix your darker color. I would probably argue that it’s a cool color too, but it’s okay for the darker shade to be cooler than the others. Cool colors tend to fade to the back.)

Now, start with the basecoat. Take your darker color and paint the entire piece thoroughly. With a high texture like I have on my tree bark, I watered the paint down a little so it would go into the crevices easier, and I had to do several coats to get all the little white cracks and holes. But trust me, you want to do that now because it’ll be a pain in the neck to do it later.

The second coat is your true color. The one you want everyone to think your tree is colored. Put a little paint on your brush, then work it in by “painting” on your palette until your brush is loaded all the way through. Then, wipe off most of the paint. You want your brush to be almost “dry,” hence the term “drybrushing.” When your brush is ready, start painting by dragging your brush lightly from top to bottom, or whichever direction your light source is coming from, letting it put paint only on the peaks and plateaus of your texture. Think of it this way: the dark color is the shadowed areas. Now you’re painting everything that isn’t a shadow. You’ve probably drybrushed before, on accident, when you were running out of paint on your brush. This is the same idea.

Here’s my piece after the middle coat:

Now, you might think this looks pretty good, but we’re not done yet. Now you take the third color and, using the same drybrushing technique, paint another coat. This time, you’re only trying to paint the parts of the texture that are high enough to be highlighted by your light source, so make sure it’s a lighter coat (in the sense of covering less territory). Like so:

I’ve been doing this for years, but I still get a kick out of how it breathes life into a dull paint job. The photo doesn’t convey as much depth as the piece has.

As an aside, do you see what I mean about the instant papier mache making the perfect texture for faux dirt? If I wanted to be even more realistic, I’d probably mix some other colors into my base coat, like a yellow ochre or black. But I’m going to cover all this up with grass, so I don’t need to get that realistic.

That’s it for today. More pictures of trees next time, I promise.

Index of Forest Thrones posts is here.


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